Princess Maria Anna of Savoy by unknown artist, ca. 1777

Princess Maria Anna of Savoy by unknown artist, ca. 1777

ornamentedbeing:

(c) Museo del Traje
Jubon - Vest, ca. 1770, Madrid. Blue silk and taffeta silk in ivory. With neck placket and long sleeves and narrow. The back ends in its lower edge in a queue. Decorated with a silk cord application and metallic threads in gold silk braid. Majismo costume, part of the movement in late 18thC Spanish clothing away from the influence of the French and towards a more Spanish style of clothing. 

For those of you that don’t know, jubón simply means “doublet” in Spanish!

ornamentedbeing:

(c) Museo del Traje

Jubon - Vest, ca. 1770, Madrid. Blue silk and taffeta silk in ivory. With neck placket and long sleeves and narrow. The back ends in its lower edge in a queue. Decorated with a silk cord application and metallic threads in gold silk braid. Majismo costume, part of the movement in late 18thC Spanish clothing away from the influence of the French and towards a more Spanish style of clothing. 

For those of you that don’t know, jubón simply means “doublet” in Spanish!

Madame de Saint-Maurice by Joseph Siffred Duplessis, 1776
I’ve always loved button-up bodices.

Madame de Saint-Maurice by Joseph Siffred Duplessis, 1776

I’ve always loved button-up bodices.

Marie-Antoinette with Uncolored (!!!) Hair by François Dumond
There’s no date, but I’d say this is late 1770s, especially because she looks so young; it could also be early 1780s (zone fronts were popular in this period). Wasn’t she beautiful? I love her delicately arched eyebrows.

Marie-Antoinette with Uncolored (!!!) Hair by François Dumond

There’s no date, but I’d say this is late 1770s, especially because she looks so young; it could also be early 1780s (zone fronts were popular in this period). Wasn’t she beautiful? I love her delicately arched eyebrows.

Robe à l’Anglaise | c. 1775
Unfortunately, I don’t know where this is from, but I’m convinced that Michael O’Connor, who designed the costumes for The Duchess, used it as inspiration for the below dress:

Robe à l’Anglaise | c. 1775

Unfortunately, I don’t know where this is from, but I’m convinced that Michael O’Connor, who designed the costumes for The Duchess, used it as inspiration for the below dress:

Riding coats, Met Museum, c. 1760 and 1775

Riding coats, Met Museum, c. 1760 and 1775


Polonaise jacket, Imotex collections, 1770s


Polonaise, Museo del Traje, 1775-85

It looks like candy!

"Levite" Open Gown and Hat after Devonshire, 1779

"Levite" Open Gown and Hat after Devonshire, 1779

Marie Antoinette by Krantzinger, c. 1771

Marie Antoinette by Krantzinger, c. 1771


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