Day Dress | 1920s | auctioned

Day Dress | 1920s | auctioned


Ensemble | 1820-25 | Met Museum


Depres Day Dress | c. 1873-75 | Met Museum


La Mode Illustrée, September 1886

Day Dress | 1886 | Met Museum

I’m ending with the late bustle period, because it seems a good quitting place and is a fun juxtaposition with the requested early bustle period of the 1870s. Quite suddenly around 1883, bustles returned with a vengeance - but they were changed from the first bustle styles. These retained the slim, flat hips of the prior natural form period, creating a dramatic “shelf” at the back of a woman’s skirts that remained until the late 1880s, when it disappeared forever.

Day and Fancy Dress Costumes, 1881
Skirts collapsed in the late 1870s and remained slim and figure-fitted until the early 1880s. Here we see more focus on lacing corsets more tightly, since illusion from wide skirts is lost and bodices are tight. While there are no bustles, “bustled” fabric aprons and overskirts are extremely common. Trains are also widely worn and popular.

Day and Fancy Dress Costumes, 1881

Skirts collapsed in the late 1870s and remained slim and figure-fitted until the early 1880s. Here we see more focus on lacing corsets more tightly, since illusion from wide skirts is lost and bodices are tight. While there are no bustles, “bustled” fabric aprons and overskirts are extremely common. Trains are also widely worn and popular.

Printed Muslin Dress | c. 1837 (fabric: 1790-1818) | Bowes Museum
Following the example from the beginning of this decade, here we see the trends I mentioned evolving even more. The clearest change is how they’ve softened! Gone are the large sleeves requiring support of their own, lower and more natural is the waistline. The decoration (and all aspects of dress in general) have relaxed from the slightly outrageous styles of the late 1820s and early 1830s; however, you can see the early ’30s neckline and skirt shape has remained.

Printed Muslin Dress | c. 1837 (fabric: 1790-1818) | Bowes Museum

Following the example from the beginning of this decade, here we see the trends I mentioned evolving even more. The clearest change is how they’ve softened! Gone are the large sleeves requiring support of their own, lower and more natural is the waistline. The decoration (and all aspects of dress in general) have relaxed from the slightly outrageous styles of the late 1820s and early 1830s; however, you can see the early ’30s neckline and skirt shape has remained.

Cotton Dress | 1810-15 | Fries Museum

Cotton Dress | 1810-15 | Fries Museum

Day Dress | 1880 | Met Museum

Day Dress | 1880 | Met Museum

Day Dress (American) | IMA | 1860s

Day Dress (American) | IMA | 1860s

Cotton Dress | Centraal Museum | 1860

Cotton Dress | Centraal Museum | 1860


2/5