I don’t know if this as exciting for y’all as it is for me but..

HOODS

ARE

PERIOD

1812 | 1814

1816

1809

fashionplatesandephemera:

La Mode Illustree, 1865

fashionplatesandephemera:

La Mode Illustree, 1865

(via )

Quite similar to the previous extant dress, this is an October 1873 fashion plate from L’Élégance Parisienne

Quite similar to the previous extant dress, this is an October 1873 fashion plate from L’Élégance Parisienne

Elastic Brassiere, 1907

Elastic Brassiere, 1907


Open Chemise Dress from Journal Des Luxus, 1788

Chemise “Retrousse” (meaning “tucked”) from Journal Des Luxus, 1789 (Aug.)


Two chemise dresses from Journal des Luxus, 1795 (Sept. and Oct.)


ornamentedbeing:

I’ve been meaning to post this for some time now but I kept forgetting to share it.

I came across this fashion plate and immediately recognized the gown.

Costume Parisien 1810

Evening dress worn by the Countess of Palfi, date missing (1810’s?), Châteaux de Malmaison et Bois-Préau Malmaison.

tiny-librarian:

Robe à l’Anglaise, the bodice laced in the back, the skirt is tucked up,* the sleeves of a colour different from that of the Gown, the whole edged with a very narrow ribbon of any desired colour. (1784)

A woman said: I would go to Rome to seek fashion, if it were required.  What is this fantastic goddess who commands so imperiously?  It is at her very express desire that everything is done, that plumes fall and rise, that hats take all sorts of forms, that the robes à l’anglaise, the chemise gown, the robe à la turque, the pierrot, the caraco have appeared alternately on the scene: that the kerchief that is very full on the neck, called the deceitful kerchief, gave the idea of a protruding throat.  Rebels submitted, or rather there were none in fashion’s empire, for the toque and the chignon comb, together with the horsehair cul, could not be escaped in fashion; she gracefully established what was, three months ago, ridiculous.”
Source

tiny-librarian:

Robe à l’Anglaise, the bodice laced in the back, the skirt is tucked up,* the sleeves of a colour different from that of the Gown, the whole edged with a very narrow ribbon of any desired colour. (1784)

A woman said: I would go to Rome to seek fashion, if it were required.  What is this fantastic goddess who commands so imperiously?  It is at her very express desire that everything is done, that plumes fall and rise, that hats take all sorts of forms, that the robes à l’anglaise, the chemise gown, the robe à la turque, the pierrot, the caraco have appeared alternately on the scene: that the kerchief that is very full on the neck, called the deceitful kerchief, gave the idea of a protruding throat.  Rebels submitted, or rather there were none in fashion’s empire, for the toque and the chignon comb, together with the horsehair cul, could not be escaped in fashion; she gracefully established what was, three months ago, ridiculous.”

Source

(via vivelareine)

Day and Fancy Dress Costumes, 1881
Skirts collapsed in the late 1870s and remained slim and figure-fitted until the early 1880s. Here we see more focus on lacing corsets more tightly, since illusion from wide skirts is lost and bodices are tight. While there are no bustles, “bustled” fabric aprons and overskirts are extremely common. Trains are also widely worn and popular.

Day and Fancy Dress Costumes, 1881

Skirts collapsed in the late 1870s and remained slim and figure-fitted until the early 1880s. Here we see more focus on lacing corsets more tightly, since illusion from wide skirts is lost and bodices are tight. While there are no bustles, “bustled” fabric aprons and overskirts are extremely common. Trains are also widely worn and popular.

La Mode Polonaise Dresses, 1872
The early bustle period is characterized by a skirt shape that’s focused backwards, but still remains slightly full at the sides. Decoration and ornamentation has returned - and is prevalent! There are many elements that recall the splendor of the eighteenth century, such as quarter-length frilled sleeves and polonaised skirts.

La Mode Polonaise Dresses, 1872

The early bustle period is characterized by a skirt shape that’s focused backwards, but still remains slightly full at the sides. Decoration and ornamentation has returned - and is prevalent! There are many elements that recall the splendor of the eighteenth century, such as quarter-length frilled sleeves and polonaised skirts.


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