Robe à l’anglaise | ca. 1780 | Colonial Williamsburg
This dress is cotton with silk embroidery - which just goes to show how spectacular an “average” material can become.

Robe à l’anglaise | ca. 1780 | Colonial Williamsburg

This dress is cotton with silk embroidery - which just goes to show how spectacular an “average” material can become.

Self-Portrait with Two Pupils, Mademoiselle Marie-Gabrielle Capet and Mademoiselle Carreaux de Rosemond by Adélaïde Labille-Guiard (1785)
I’m writing on this stunning piece by Labille-Guiard for an art history comparison and I can’t decide - do you think her robe à l’anglaise is made out of taffeta or satin? My initial idea was taffeta, since it has such a thick and heavy drape, but the sheen looks more like satin (and the presence of a lining, which looks more like the slightly matte appearance of taffeta, would explain its weight). What do you think?
As a side note, I will make Labille-Guiard’s gown (as well as the one worn by the most visible student, who I suspect is Marie Marguerite Carreaux de Rosemond) - and if it’s satin, then I already have the main fabric!

Self-Portrait with Two Pupils, Mademoiselle Marie-Gabrielle Capet and Mademoiselle Carreaux de Rosemond by Adélaïde Labille-Guiard (1785)

I’m writing on this stunning piece by Labille-Guiard for an art history comparison and I can’t decide - do you think her robe à l’anglaise is made out of taffeta or satin? My initial idea was taffeta, since it has such a thick and heavy drape, but the sheen looks more like satin (and the presence of a lining, which looks more like the slightly matte appearance of taffeta, would explain its weight). What do you think?

As a side note, I will make Labille-Guiard’s gown (as well as the one worn by the most visible student, who I suspect is Marie Marguerite Carreaux de Rosemond) - and if it’s satin, then I already have the main fabric!

Robe à l’Anglaise | c. 1775
Unfortunately, I don’t know where this is from, but I’m convinced that Michael O’Connor, who designed the costumes for The Duchess, used it as inspiration for the below dress:

Robe à l’Anglaise | c. 1775

Unfortunately, I don’t know where this is from, but I’m convinced that Michael O’Connor, who designed the costumes for The Duchess, used it as inspiration for the below dress:

damesalamode:

Gallerie des Modes, 1784. 
What an elegant gown.  The colors are so pretty together, and I really like the sleeve detailing, the banding, and the skirt lined with a different color. 

damesalamode:

Gallerie des Modes, 1784. 

What an elegant gown.  The colors are so pretty together, and I really like the sleeve detailing, the banding, and the skirt lined with a different color. 

English Robe a l’anglaise, LACMA, c. 1780-1790

(below photos by Kat)


(below photos from LACMA)

English Robe a l’anglaise, LACMA, c. 1780-1790

(below photos by Kat)

(below photos from LACMA)

Robe a l’anglaise, Met Museum, 1784-1878

whattheywore:

This is one of my favourite dresses from the Kyoto Costume Institute collection! I even made an attempt to draw it, but I think it is preferable to show you the original version.
Robe à l’anglaise with black and wine-coloured decoration and fichu at neck, 1790s.
A fichu was a thin draped material which covered the shoulders and neck, sometimes tucked into the stomacher or crossed over the breasts. In the 19th century, after cashmere was brought to Western Europe, the fichu was replaced with large shawls.

I’m so happy you posted this! I don’t have the Kyoto “Bible” yet, and it’s nearly impossible to find photos online. Thank you!

whattheywore:

This is one of my favourite dresses from the Kyoto Costume Institute collection! I even made an attempt to draw it, but I think it is preferable to show you the original version.

Robe à l’anglaise with black and wine-coloured decoration and fichu at neck, 1790s.

A fichu was a thin draped material which covered the shoulders and neck, sometimes tucked into the stomacher or crossed over the breasts. In the 19th century, after cashmere was brought to Western Europe, the fichu was replaced with large shawls.

I’m so happy you posted this! I don’t have the Kyoto “Bible” yet, and it’s nearly impossible to find photos online. Thank you!

Here is a wonderful pink candy-striped Robe à l’Anglaise from 1785. Stripes were very popular during the eighteenth century, and though outfits usually didn’t match like this I love the look :) A fichu is wrapped over the chest to protect the woman’s modesty (since most dresses, even for the day, were very low-cut during this era, fichus were used to make it acceptable for the daytime).
From the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Here is a wonderful pink candy-striped Robe à l’Anglaise from 1785. Stripes were very popular during the eighteenth century, and though outfits usually didn’t match like this I love the look :) A fichu is wrapped over the chest to protect the woman’s modesty (since most dresses, even for the day, were very low-cut during this era, fichus were used to make it acceptable for the daytime).

From the Metropolitan Museum of Art.